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1 December 2002 Coastal Resources and Management Systems Influenced by Conflict and Migration: Mecúfi, Mozambique
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Abstract
Coastal resource utilization and management systems, both traditional and more recently conceived, were studied in Mecúfi district, northern Mozambique in a post-conflict situation prior to which a significant migration of people to the coast had occurred. A wide variety of coastal biotopes containing a multitude of resources had been affected in various ways. Intertidal organisms exhibited signs of decreasing abundance and average size, whereas offshore fishes and mangrove forests did not show signs of overutilization. It was observed that traditional coastal management systems were still influential, but that newer initiatives were only beginning to enter into significant dialogue and cooperation with these. In the current circumstances of peace and political stability, the principal threat to coastal management and the interests of local people in Mecúfi is considered to be potential loss of common property resources and land tenure in the face of prospects of privatization, but Mozambican authorities are presently addressing these issues with legal reforms.
Ian Bryceson and Alfredo Massinga "Coastal Resources and Management Systems Influenced by Conflict and Migration: Mecúfi, Mozambique," AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment 31(7), (1 December 2002). https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447-31.7.512
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