Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2003 Sustainability Appraisal of Shifting Cultivation in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
An integrated socioeconomic and erosion study on the sustainability of traditional shifting cultivation (Jhum) carried out in 1998 and 1999 in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh showed the system to be nonsustainable under the current conditions with fallow periods of only 3–5 years and lack of land rights. An estimated input (mainly labor) of USD 380 ha–1 yr–1 results in only a total output of USD 360 ha–1 yr–1 and Jhum cultivated areas suffer severe loss of soil and valuable plant nutrients along with runoff during the rainy season. To compensate these losses by commercial fertilizers will cost nearly USD 2 million yr–1 for CHT. To ensure long-term productivity of the soils, Jhum should therefore be adjusted to a tolerable level and farmers should be given rights and title to the land to motivate them to switch to improved, settled farming systems.
Ole K. Borggaard, Abdul Gafur and Leif Petersen "Sustainability Appraisal of Shifting Cultivation in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh," AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment 32(2), (1 March 2003). https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447-32.2.118
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top