Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2006 Carbon Budgets for Catchments Across a Managed Landscape Mosaic in Southeast Sweden: Contributing to the Safety Assessment of a Nuclear Waste Repository
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Ecosystem budgets of matter contribute to the assessment of transport and accumulation of bioavailable contaminants in a landscape, since flows of matter and energy ultimately determine the rates at which contaminants will be partitioned in the environment. This study compares ecosystem properties, such as net primary production (NPP), sequestration of matter and fluxes to food sources for humans, which are of potential interest to describe fluxes and accumulation of bioavailable radionuclides in 14 catchments within a larger catchment area in southeast Sweden. The carbon budgets, used as a proxy for organic matter, are mainly based on local estimates of pools and fluxes, which have been distributed across a landscape mosaic of different vegetation types and management regimes using a geographical information system (GIS). NPP varied by a factor close to two (432 - 709 g·C·m−2·y−1), while net ecosystem production ranged between −124 and 159 g·C·m−2·y−1 for the different catchments. Carbon sequestration mainly occurred in the vegetation while the soil organic carbon pool was mainly a source of carbon. Large herbivores consumed on average 4.5 % of the above-ground green tissue production. When arable land was present in the catchment, the flux of carbon to humans was highest from crops and, in decreasing order, milk and beef, followed by the flux from hunting and berry/fungus picking. The results can be used to estimate the potential assimilation of radionuclides in vegetation and the potential exposure to humans of bioavailable radionuclides.
Anders Löfgren, Sofia Miliander, Johan Truvé and Tobias Lindborg "Carbon Budgets for Catchments Across a Managed Landscape Mosaic in Southeast Sweden: Contributing to the Safety Assessment of a Nuclear Waste Repository," AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment 35(8), (1 December 2006). https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447(2006)35[459:CBFCAA]2.0.CO;2
JOURNAL ARTICLE
10 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top