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1 February 2008 Effect of Climate Change on Flux of N and C: Air-Land-Freshwater-Marine Links: Synthesis
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Abstract

Projected climate change might increase the deposition of nitrogen by about 10% to seminatural ecosystems in southern Norway. At Storgama, increased precipitation in the growing season increased the fluxes of total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic nitrogen (TON) in proportion to the water flux. In winter, soil temperatures near 0°C, common under a snowpack, induced higher runoff of inorganic nitrogen (N) and lower runoff of TOC. By contrast, soil temperatures below freezing, caused by little snow accumulation (expected in a warmer world), reduced runoff of inorganic N, TON, and TOC. Long-term monitoring data showed that reduced snowpack can cause either decreased or increased N leaching, depending on interactions with N deposition, soil temperature regime, and winter discharge. Seasonal variation in TOC was mainly climatically controlled, whereas deposition of sulfate and nitrate (NO3) explained the long-term TOC increase. Upscaling to the river basin scale showed that the annual flux of NO3 will remain unchanged in response to climate change projections.

Arne O. Stuanes, Heleen A. de Wit, Lars R. Hole, Øyvind Kaste, Jan Mulder, Gunnhild Riise, and Richard F. Wright "Effect of Climate Change on Flux of N and C: Air-Land-Freshwater-Marine Links: Synthesis," AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment 37(1), 2-8, (1 February 2008). https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447(2008)37[2:EOCCOF]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 February 2008
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