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1 April 2011 Molecular Detection of Anaplasma, Babesia and Theileria Species in a Diversity of Tick Species from Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Abstract

Ticks transmit a greater variety of pathogens to mammals than any other blood-sucking arthropod vector, predisposing susceptible individuals to infection with clinical symptoms. A study was conducted to determine the range of haemoparasites in ticks that can pose a health risk to susceptible animals in the Ngorongoro Crater. Questing ticks were collected randomly in crater grassland. Amblyomma tick species were collected under moribund grass cover and on hosts; one-host and two-host Rhipicephalus tick species were collected on immobilized wild animals. Pools of five ticks were prepared according to species and source and processed for nucleic acid extraction. Haemoparasite DNA was amplified by PCR for Anaplasma species (n = 118), Babesla species (n = 102) and Theileria species (n = 115). Eleven tick species were identified, eight of which were PCR positive for one or more haemoparasites. Sequence analyses for rRNA gene fragments detected Anaplasma bovis, Babesia equi, Theileria buffeli and Theileria parva. Therefore, susceptible livestock and endangered wildlife species in crater grassland are at risk of contracting related diseases.

Robert D. Fyumagwa, Pascale Simmler, Marina L. Meli, Richard Hoare, Regina Hofmann-Lehmann, and Hans Lutz "Molecular Detection of Anaplasma, Babesia and Theileria Species in a Diversity of Tick Species from Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania," South African Journal of Wildlife Research 41(1), 79-86, (1 April 2011). https://doi.org/10.3957/056.041.0109
Received: 14 July 2009; Accepted: 1 June 2010; Published: 1 April 2011
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