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1 June 2012 The Influence of Emersion on the Rate at Which Nucella lamellosa (Muricidae) Consumes Prey in the Laboratory
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Abstract

Nucella lamellosa (Gmelin, 1791) is a phenotypically plastic species that preys on barnacles and occurs intertidally and subtidally along the north-eastern Pacific coast. This laboratory experiment tests the hypothesis that daily episodes of emersion impose a greater stress than daily episodes of limiting food in N. lamellosa. In this experiment, individuals of N. lamellosa were housed in containers with a rock covered with barnacles. In one experimental treatment, I removed snails from their barnacle-covered rocks and placed them on a counter for five hours each day. In another treatment, I placed the snail-and-rock assemblage on a counter for five hours each day. In a final experimental treatment, I kept the snails submersed, but placed the barnacle-covered rocks in an empty sea table for five hours each day. A control treatment kept individuals constantly submersed with continuous access to food. To account for the effect of handling the snails, individuals in a manipulation control were picked up and then immediately returned to their rocks. When individuals of N. lamellosa were removed from the water without their barnacle-covered rocks, they ate significantly less than snails in either control group and significantly less than the snails that were constantly submersed but without food for five hours a day. This result suggests that daily episodes of emersion are more stressful than daily episodes of limiting food.

Rebecca M. Price "The Influence of Emersion on the Rate at Which Nucella lamellosa (Muricidae) Consumes Prey in the Laboratory," American Malacological Bulletin 30(2), (1 June 2012). https://doi.org/10.4003/006.030.0204
Received: 13 October 2011; Accepted: 1 May 2012; Published: 1 June 2012
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