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1 June 2012 Differences in Small-Mammal and Stand Structures between Unburned and Burned Pine Stands Subjected to Two Different Post-Fire Silvicultural Management Practices
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Abstract

We examined the abundances of three small-mammal species, Korean field mice (Apodemus peninsulae), Korean red-backed voles (Myodes regulus), and striped field mice (A. agrarius), and a stand structure of unburned and burned stands resulting from two different post-fire silvicultural management practices within a pine forest in South Korea. The habitat structure changed dramatically depending on the post-fire silvicultural practices. Most measured variables of the stand structure and downed trees were significantly different among the differently-managed stands. We captured 776 animals of five species (1114 captures in total) in nine stands, each trapped during the two-year study period. The total abundances of captured small mammals did not differ significantly among the differently-managed stands. Mean Jolly—Seber estimates of the population density of M. regulus were 79%–291% higher in the post-burned untreated stand, whereas those of A. agrarius were 214%–491% higher in the post-burned Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) planted stand. The preferred stands for small mammal species were generated by forest fire and post-fire silvicultural practices. The values of understory vegetation, coarse woody debris, and downed trees were most strongly related to small-mammal abundance following post-fire silvicultural practices. Therefore, the effects of post-fire silvicultural practices on small-mammal populations should be considered in the post-fire management of a burned pine forest.

© Finnish Zoological and Botanical Publishing Board 2012
Eun Jae Lee, Shin-Jae Rhim, Seung-Hun Son, and Woo-Shin Lee "Differences in Small-Mammal and Stand Structures between Unburned and Burned Pine Stands Subjected to Two Different Post-Fire Silvicultural Management Practices," Annales Zoologici Fennici 49(3), 129-138, (1 June 2012). https://doi.org/10.5735/086.049.0301
Received: 13 December 2011; Accepted: 1 February 2012; Published: 1 June 2012
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