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1 June 2006 OLIGOCENE AND MIOCENE DECAPODS (THALASSINIDEA AND BRACHYURA) FROM THE CARIBBEAN
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Abstract

Oligocene and Miocene fossil decapods from Puerto Rico and Cuba have been poorly known; new collections from these regions as well as from the Dominican Republic have now yielded several new reports. One new genus, Psygmophthalmus, and several new species (Neocallichirus aetodes, Neocallichirus? quisquellanus, Calappa pavimenta, Necronectes collinsi, Portunus yaucoensis, and Psygmophthalmus lares) are named herein. New combinations include Euphylax domingensis (Rathbun 1919), Megokkos feldmanni (Nyborg et al. 2003), and Neocallichirus vaughni (Rathbun 1918). Specimens of a callianassoid and brachyuran indeterminate at the family, genus, and species level are also described and illustrated, and emended descriptions are provided for Euphylax domingensis and Megokkos feldmanni. Scylla costata Rathbun, 1919, and three indeterminate species of Portunus are also reported. Ceronnectes De Angeli and Beschin, 1998, is a member of the Cancridae, not the Portunidae as originally reported. Most of the Caribbean taxa reported herein belong to tropical or subtropical extant genera that inhabit both carbonate and siliciclastic, soft, shallow marine substrates, supported by the occurrence of most of the fossils in clastic units. The Cenozoic genera reported herein exhibited either a Tethyan or North Pacific distribution, typical of Eocene and Oligocene decapods of the region. The open Caribbean Seaway facilitated dispersal of fauna throughout the region between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Carrie E. Schweitzer, Manuel Iturralde-Vinent, Joanna L. Hetler, and Jorge Velez-Juarbe "OLIGOCENE AND MIOCENE DECAPODS (THALASSINIDEA AND BRACHYURA) FROM THE CARIBBEAN," Annals of Carnegie Museum 75(2), (1 June 2006). https://doi.org/10.2992/0097-4463(2006)75[111:OAMDTA]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 June 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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