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1 November 2009 Leg Regeneration Trade-Offs in the Twostriped Walkingstick (Phasmatodea: Pseudophasmatidae)
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Abstract

Appendage regeneration is a unique tool to study resource allocation trade-offs; the resources allocated to grow an appendage a second time can come at the expense of other structures. We studied the effects of both front and hind leg regeneration on a suite of traits in Anisomorpha buprestoides (Stoll) (Phasmatodea: Pseudophasmatidae), the twostriped walkingstick. This species is ideal for resource allocation questions because it has a relatively long life history as well as a large group of traits to measure for any potential trade-offs (including large defensive glands in the thorax that are used to deter predators). For females, there were no apparent trade-offs with respect to antennae, eyes, defensive glands, nonregenerated legs, cerci, genital plates, and/or body size. In males, there were no also no apparent trade-offs with respect to antennae, eyes, defensive glands, nonregenerated legs, cerci, or testes, but males that regenerated a leg were larger (but not heavier) than nonregenerating males. Future work at the physiological level will hopefully elucidate the nature of acquisitionallocation trade-offs in phasmids, and how such trade-offs may have shaped their evolution.

© 2009 Entomological Society of America
Tara L. Maginnis and Christopher R. Redmond "Leg Regeneration Trade-Offs in the Twostriped Walkingstick (Phasmatodea: Pseudophasmatidae)," Annals of the Entomological Society of America 102(6), 1099-1104, (1 November 2009). https://doi.org/10.1603/008.102.0618
Received: 21 June 2009; Accepted: 1 August 2009; Published: 1 November 2009
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