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1 September 2001 Distribution and Parasitism of Sophonia rufofascia (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) Eggs in Hawaii
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Abstract

The leafhopper Sophonia rufofascia (Kuoh & Kuoh) is a recent invasive pest attacking a wide variety of plant species in Hawaii. We surveyed the distribution and parasitism of its eggs in a number of natural and agricultural habitats on the islands of Kauai, Oahu, and Hawaii. Egg density was fairly low, with egg distribution affected both by plant species and plant habitat. Approximately 40% of S. rufofascia eggs, averaged over all plants and sites, were parasitized by Chaetomymar sp. nr. bagichi Narayanan, Subba Rao, & Kaur; Schizophragma bicolor (Dozier); and Polynema sp. Haliday (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae). Percentage parasitism varied widely among different plant species and habitats. C. sp. nr. bagichi was the most abundant and widely distributed species, but the parasitoid guild varied depending on plant and on habitat. The implications of these results on decisions regarding classical biological control of twospotted leafhopper in Hawaii are discussed.

Andrei V. Alyokhin, Pingjun Yang, and Russell H. Messing "Distribution and Parasitism of Sophonia rufofascia (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) Eggs in Hawaii," Annals of the Entomological Society of America 94(5), (1 September 2001). https://doi.org/10.1603/0013-8746(2001)094[0664:DAPOSR]2.0.CO;2
Received: 6 September 2000; Accepted: 1 March 2001; Published: 1 September 2001
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