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1 December 2013 Dog burials associated with Human burials in the West Indies during the early pre-Columbian Ceramic Age (500 BC-600 AD)
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Abstract

Across the Caribbean, the widespread presence of canine remains at archaeological sites from the Salado id period raises questions about the role of “man's best friend.” Dog (Canis familiaris) remains have been found located in both refuse middens and burials adjacent to human graves in a number of sites in the French Antilles and Barbuda, West Indies. This paper will critically examine dog remains and discuss the varied duality of the dog's role in the Saladoid world: from food source to lifelong companion. The importance of dogs within Amerindian sites from Saint Martin, the Guadeloupe archipelago, Martinique and Barbuda will be explored from a zooarchaeological perspective, concluding with a critical discussion of changes in cultural patterns, as seen through the decline in dog remains during the Troumassoid and Suazoid period at the sites in the French Antilles.

© Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
Sandrine Grouard, Sophia Perdikaris, and Karyne Debue "Dog burials associated with Human burials in the West Indies during the early pre-Columbian Ceramic Age (500 BC-600 AD)," Anthropozoologica 48(2), (1 December 2013). https://doi.org/10.5252/az2013n2a17
Received: 25 October 2011; Accepted: 10 May 2012; Published: 1 December 2013
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