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1 August 2010 Terrestrial Arthropods of Pre- and Post-eruption Kasatochi Island, Alaska, 2008–2009: a Shift from a Plant-Based to a Necromass-Based Food Web
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Abstract

On 11 June 2008 the first author spent 10.66 h on Kasatochi Island and collected 396 terrestrial arthropod specimens estimated to represent a minimum of 58 species. Among these are included the first Alaskan records of the fly genus Lestremia and the ghost moth Sthenopis quadriguttatus (Grote). Also found were a new species of salpingid beetle in the genus Aegialites and sawfly in the genus Pseudodineura. On 10 and 12 August 2009, one year after an eruption that buried the island in ash, the first author spent 15 h sampling terrestrial arthropods. Specimens were also collected on 12–14 June 2009 by other team members. An estimated 17 post-eruption species were documented by the collection of 210 specimens. Evidence of breeding was seen in 4–9 species. Pitfall traps run from 14 June to 10 August 2009 flooded, capturing no arthropods. Fallout collectors representing 1 m2, run during the same period, had four flies and no seeds. The majority of species recovered post-eruption were probably survivors or their offspring, some of which had commenced breeding on rotting kelp and bird carcasses. Of significance as the first post-eruption evidence of multi-trophic level interaction, a fly predator on kelp flies, Scathophaga, and an ichneumonid endoparasite of flies, Phygadeuon, were also present. No phytophagous or fungivorous species were found. Supporting the heterotrophs-first hypothesis of Hodkinson et al. (2002), the current terrestrial ecosystem of Kasatochi is necromass-based rather than plant-based.

Derek S. Sikes and Jozef Slowik "Terrestrial Arthropods of Pre- and Post-eruption Kasatochi Island, Alaska, 2008–2009: a Shift from a Plant-Based to a Necromass-Based Food Web," Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research 42(3), 297-305, (1 August 2010). https://doi.org/10.1657/1938-4246-42.3.297
Accepted: 1 April 2010; Published: 1 August 2010
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