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1 March 2007 Impact of Different Husbandry Conditions on Contact and Airborne Transmission of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus to Chickens
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Abstract

Typically highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses spread very rapidly among chickens within sheds. However, the spread was slower than expected for the initial 10 days of the index farm in Japan during 2004. This slow spread, as well as the lack of gross lesions, clinical signs, or high mortality, hindered the field veterinarian from reporting a suspected HPAI outbreak to the veterinary office. To understand the field conditions for the slow virus spread, we examined contact and airborne transmission of the H5N1 virus to chickens in a negative-pressure isolator using various numbers of infected chickens and separate compartments. We found that the contact transmission did occur inefficiently when one or two chickens were infected, whereas the transmission was efficient when four chickens were infected. Airborne transmission of the HPAI virus was also dependent on the number of infected chickens and was less efficient than contact transmission. These data together with field observations suggested that number of infected chickens, chicken house types, and amount of environmental contamination might affect the virus transmission efficiency to chickens.

K. Tsukamoto, T. Imada, N. Tanimura, M. Okamatsu, M. Mase, T. Mizuhara, D. Swayne, and S. Yamaguchi "Impact of Different Husbandry Conditions on Contact and Airborne Transmission of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus to Chickens," Avian Diseases 51(1), (1 March 2007). https://doi.org/10.1637/0005-2086(2007)051[0129:IODHCO]2.0.CO;2
Received: 16 June 2006; Accepted: 1 November 2006; Published: 1 March 2007
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