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1 September 2008 Persistence of Exotic Newcastle Disease Virus (ENDV) in Laboratory Infected Musca domestica and Fannia canicularis
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Abstract

House flies (Musca domestica) and little house flies (Fannia canicularis) were examined for their ability to take up and harbor a velogenic strain of exotic Newcastle disease virus (ENDV) (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Avulavirus). Laboratory-reared flies were allowed to feed on evaporated milk containing ENDV at a virus concentration of 108.3 egg infectious dose (EID)50/0.1 ml or on poultry feces containing an ENDV titer of 105.8 EID50/0.1 g. Flies exposed to either infectious food source for 24 hr became transiently infected with virus. Virus persisted predominantly in the mid- and hindgut, with relatively little virus isolated from the remainder of the fly body. Virus persisted similarly in both fly species that were fed evaporated milk containing ENDV, with a maximum ENDV titer of 105.98 EID50/fly for the house fly and 104.78 EID50/fly for the little house fly at 1 day postexposure; titers decreased on subsequent days to 102.38 EID50/fly for house fly and ≥1 EID50/fly for little house fly at 5 days postexposure. Both fly species acquired viral titers greater than the infective dose for a susceptible chicken (103.0 EID50–104.0 EID50). In addition, flies fed evaporated milk containing a high titer of ENDV maintained viral titers above the infective dose for up to 4 days postexposure to the infectious food source. Flies fed on infective feces retained a chicken infective dose for only one day. The decrease in viral titer over time was significantly explained by logistic regression for both fly species (P < 0.05). The slope of the regression line was not different for the two fly species (P < 0.05), indicating a similar rate of virus loss.

Persistencia del virus velogénico de la enfermedad de Newcastle en moscas domésticas (Musca domestica) y moscas domésticas pequeñas (Fannia canicularis) infectadas experimentalmente.

Se evaluó la capacidad de moscas domésticas (Musca domestica) y moscas domésticas pequeñas (Fannia canicularis) de infectarse y ser portadores de una cepa velogénica del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle (familia Paramyxoviridae, género Avulavirus). Se permitió que moscas criadas en el laboratorio se alimentaran de leche evaporada contaminada con virus velogénico de la enfermedad de Newcastle a una concentración de 108.3 dosis infectiva 50 para embrión por cada 0.1 ml (DIE50/0.1 ml) o en heces de aves que contenían virus velogénico de la enfermedad de Newcastle a una concentración de 105.8 DIE50/0.1g. Las moscas expuestas por 24 horas a cualquiera de las dos fuentes de alimentación se infectaron transitoriamente con el virus. El virus persistió predominantemente en la porción media y distal del intestino, con relativamente poco virus aislado del resto del cuerpo de las moscas. El virus persistió de manera similar en las dos especies de moscas que fueron alimentadas con la leche evaporada que contenía el virus velogénico de la enfermedad de Newcastle, mostrando un día posterior a la infección un título máximo de 105.9 DIE50/mosca para la mosca doméstica y de 104.7 DIE50/mosca para la mosca doméstica pequeña. Los títulos decrecieron en los días subsecuentes hasta niveles de 102.3 DIE50/mosca para la mosca doméstica y ≥1DIE50/mosca para la mosca doméstica pequeña al quinto día posterior a la infección. Amba

Seemanti Chakrabarti, Daniel J. King, Carol J. Cardona, and Alec C. Gerry "Persistence of Exotic Newcastle Disease Virus (ENDV) in Laboratory Infected Musca domestica and Fannia canicularis," Avian Diseases 52(3), (1 September 2008). https://doi.org/10.1637/8173-111407-Reg
Received: 26 November 2007; Accepted: 1 February 2008; Published: 1 September 2008
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