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1 December 2011 A Preliminary Study of Heteromeles arbutifolia Fruit Morphology at Ballona Wetlands and Temescal Canyon, Los Angeles, California
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Abstract

Heteromeles arbutifolia, the California holly, is an evergreen shrub native to chaparral habitats of Southern California that fruits from November to January. Fruit species morphology has been shown to be a good indicator of habitat quality among other plants. The variation in fruit morphology was examined for the native plant at two diverse Southern California sites, a wetland and a canyon. California Holly fruits had a significantly greater volume in Ballona Wetlands than at Temescal Canyon (Z=4.367, P<.001), as well as a significantly greater variance in Ballona Wetlands than at Temescal Canyon (F=2.357, P=0.02). The production of fruits with larger and more variable volumes in Ballona Wetlands may be a response to the presence of urban influences and environmental contaminants. As the reproductive structure, fruit morphology may be a good indicator of how habitat stress influences reproductive success.

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Phil Simmons, Elise Vo, Elizabeth Wight, and Víctor D. Carmona-Galindo "A Preliminary Study of Heteromeles arbutifolia Fruit Morphology at Ballona Wetlands and Temescal Canyon, Los Angeles, California," BIOS 82(4), 117-119, (1 December 2011). https://doi.org/10.1893/011.082.0403
Received: 29 April 2010; Accepted: 1 February 2011; Published: 1 December 2011
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