Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2000 Use of Coarse Woody Debris by the Plant Community of a Hawaiian Montane Cloud Forest
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Many species of woody plants in Hawaiian montane forests germinate on nurse logs or epiphytically, often developing aerial roots. This study investigated the role of fallen logs, wood fragments, and other forms of coarse woody debris (CWD; 35 cm diam.) in providing habitat for woody species in a forest with waterlogged soils. Oxidation-reduction potentials (Eh) of root mats and nurse logs (−70.1 to 278.6 mV) were higher than the underlying soil horizons (−203.6 to −128.1 mV). CWD volume varied between 135.9 and 427.9 m3/ha. Live basal area varied between 18.4 and 29.7 m2/ha and increased with total CWD volume. Seedling and sapling abundances on nurse logs were correlated with moss coverage and decomposition class. Moss coverage was the only significant predictor of seedling density on nurse logs, whereas moss coverage and log volume were important for predicting sapling density. The proportion of woody plants established on logs was higher than in a younger Hawaiian montane forest site with well-drained soils.

Louis S. Santiago "Use of Coarse Woody Debris by the Plant Community of a Hawaiian Montane Cloud Forest," BIOTROPICA 32(4), 633-641, (1 December 2000). https://doi.org/10.1646/0006-3606(2000)032[0633:UOCWDB]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 December 2000
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top