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1 June 2004 Effects of Animal Pollination on Pollen Dispersal, Selfing, and Effective Population Size of Tropical Trees: A Simulation Study
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Abstract

Animals, especially insects, are principal pollen vectors of tropical trees and have behavior patterns that affect gene dispersal. Here, we explore complex pollination systems using a new simulation model Eco-Gene and considering, among other factors, flowering synchrony, spatial distribution of trees, degree of selfing, population densities, pollinator flight distances, pollen deposition, and pollinator response to floral display size. Sensitivity analyses using two contrasting tree data sets (Jacaranda copaia and Dipteryx odorata) determined the importance of each parameter on three response variables: the proportion of seeds from self-pollination, effective population size, and pollen dispersal. Spatial considerations and attractiveness of floral displays were prominent features determining the population genetic result of pollinators, and some biological implications of the results are discussed.

Bernd Degen and David W. Roubik "Effects of Animal Pollination on Pollen Dispersal, Selfing, and Effective Population Size of Tropical Trees: A Simulation Study," BIOTROPICA 36(2), (1 June 2004). https://doi.org/10.1646/Q1554
Published: 1 June 2004
JOURNAL ARTICLE
15 PAGES

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