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1 May 2009 Climate Change and the World's “Sacred Sea”—Lake Baikal, Siberia
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Abstract

Lake Baikal—the world's largest, oldest, and most biotically diverse lake—is responding strongly to climate change, according to recent analyses of water temperature and ice cover. By the end of this century, the climate of the Baikal region will be warmer and wetter, particularly in winter. As the climate changes, ice cover and transparency, water temperature, wind dynamics and mixing, and nutrient levels are the key abiotic variables that will shift, thus eliciting many biotic responses. Among the abiotic variables, changes in ice cover will quite likely alter food-web structure and function most because of the diverse ways in which ice affects the lake's dominant primary producers (endemic diatoms), the top predator (the world's only freshwater seal), and other abiotic variables. Melting permafrost will probably exacerbate the effects of additional anthropogenic stressors (industrial pollution and cultural eutrophication) and could greatly affect ecosystem functioning.

©2009 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site at www.ucpressjournals.com/reprintinfo.asp.
Marianne V. Moore, Stephanie E. Hampton, Lyubov R. Izmest'Eva, Eugene A. Silow, Ekaterina V. Peshkova, and Boris K. Pavlov "Climate Change and the World's “Sacred Sea”—Lake Baikal, Siberia," BioScience 59(5), (1 May 2009). https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2009.59.5.8
Published: 1 May 2009
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