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8 January 2019 Influence of dietary protease supplementation to corn–soybean meal-based high- and low-energy diets on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood profiles, and gas emission in growing pigs
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Abstract

A total of 140 growing pigs [Duroc × (Yorkshire × Landrace)] with an average body weight of 24.10 ± 1.66 kg were used in a 6 wk trial to determine the effect of dietary protease supplementation to low- and high-energy diets for pigs. Pigs were randomly allowed to one of four dietary treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design with two levels of energy and 0 or 125 g ton-1 of protease. During 6 wk, pigs fed on the high-energy diets had greater (P < 0.05) average daily gain (ADG), gain to feed ratio (G:F), and energy digestibility than those fed low-energy diets. Protease supplementation increased (P < 0.05) energy digestibility and creatinine levels in the blood. Also, protease supplementation tended to increase (P < 0.1) dry matter digestibility, G:F, blood urea nitrogen concentrations and to decrease (P < 0.1) ammonia gas emission, and norepinephrine levels in the blood. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with 125 g ton-1 protease has beneficial effect on growth performance and nutrient digestibility. The noxious gas emission was also reduced in pigs fed protease-supplemented diets. In addition, ADG and feed efficiency were improved in pigs fed high-energy diets.

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D.H. Nguyen, S.D. Upadhaya, X.J. Lei, J. Yin, and I.H. Kim "Influence of dietary protease supplementation to corn–soybean meal-based high- and low-energy diets on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood profiles, and gas emission in growing pigs," Canadian Journal of Animal Science 99(3), 482-488, (8 January 2019). https://doi.org/10.1139/cjas-2017-0104
Received: 19 July 2017; Accepted: 7 December 2018; Published: 8 January 2019
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