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1 January 2011 Morphological characterization of triticale starch granules during endosperm development and seed germination
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Abstract

Li, C.-Y., Li, W.-H., Lee, B., Laroche, A., Cao, L.-P. and Lu, Z.-X. 2011. Morphological characterization of triticale starch granules during endosperm development and seed germination. Can. J. Plant Sci. 91: 57-67. The morphology of starch granules and its changes during endosperm development and seed germination in triticale has been investigated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Starch granules were rapidly accumulating in triticale endosperm after 6 d postanthesis (DPA). The double-disk structure of starch granules was detected in endosperms from 6 DPA until 27 DPA in triticale and its parental crops, wheat and rye. The equatorial grooves of triticale starch granules were more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis than the broad or flat surfaces. Triticale starch was slowly degraded within 4 or 5 d post germination (DPG) and most starch granules were almost completely hydrolyzed after 9 DPG. Morphological changes of starch granules observed under SEM during the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis were consistent with patterns identified during the germination process. As a hybrid of wheat and rye, triticale inherits many morphological characteristics of starch synthesis and storage in the seed endosperm. However, triticale also possesses unique features of granule shape, size, distribution, and enzyme susceptibility. These results will make it possible to effectively utilize triticale starch in the starch-based production.

Chun-Yan Li, Wei-Hua Li, Byron Lee, André Laroche, Lian-Pu Cao, and Zhen-Xiang Lu "Morphological characterization of triticale starch granules during endosperm development and seed germination," Canadian Journal of Plant Science 91(1), 57-67, (1 January 2011). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJPS10039
Received: 16 February 2010; Accepted: 1 September 2010; Published: 1 January 2011
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