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1 July 2011 The Biology of Canadian Weeds. 146. Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron and Judd
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Abstract

Hébert, F. and Thiffault, N. 2011. The Biology of Canadian Weeds. 146.Rhododendron groenlandicum(Oeder) Kron and Judd. Can. J. Plant Sci. 91: 725-738. Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron and Judd, bog Labrador tea, is an evergreen shrub from the Ericacae family native to North America. Bog Labrador tea is associated with the later stages of forest successions in black spruce forest stands of the boreal ecosystems with cool climates, but responds aggressively to forest openings where it is already present. In general, bog Labrador tea is associated with nutrient-poor, acidic soils, with drainage ranging from moist to wet. Layering is the main regeneration strategy of the species; evidence suggests that this could be especially true following disturbances that open the forest canopy. Sexual reproduction maintains viability in undisturbed communities through wind or water dispersal. Rhododendron groenlandicum acclimates more rapidly relative to black spruce after perturbations through a higher rate of resource utilization when resources are available. The species is a highly competitive shrub for soil nutrients; it competes with regenerating conifers for soil nitrogen and phosphorus. It can also assimilate organic nitrogen from the soil through its mycorhizae. These characteristics may lead to the formation of ericaceous heaths that can stay unforested indefinitely. However, this species can be eradicated by herbicides (glyphosate) and heavy site scarification can limit its propagation.

François Hébert and Nelson Thiffault "The Biology of Canadian Weeds. 146. Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron and Judd," Canadian Journal of Plant Science 91(4), 725-738, (1 July 2011). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJPS2010-012
Received: 29 October 2010; Accepted: 1 March 2011; Published: 1 July 2011
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