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18 February 2014 Impact of : ratio and nitrogen supply on nitrogen remobilization in potted chrysanthemum grown in a subirrigation system
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Abstract

MacDonald, W. N., Tsujita, M. J., Blom, T. J. and Shelp, B. J. 2014. Impact of : ratio and nitrogen supply on nitrogen remobilization in potted chrysanthemum grown in a subirrigation system. Can. J. Plant Sci. 94: 867-880. Subirrigation is being adopted as an environmentally friendly strategy for managing the nutrition of potted greenhouse plants. Here, we investigated two strategies for enhancing the remobilization of N during the development of the inflorescence in subirrigated potted chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) in an attempt to improve nitrogen (N) use efficiency. (1) The replacement of a portion of the nitrate in the nutrient solution with ammonium decreased the nitrate content, especially in the stem plus petioles, and increased the reduced N content early in the growth cycle, but did not improve N use efficiency. (2) The use of a lower N supply (200 vs. 400 mg total N per pot delivered over 3 and 5 wk, respectively), either as nitrate or ammonium nitrate, eliminated nitrate accumulation prior to inflorescence development, thereby improving N use efficiency. Inflorescence quality was unaffected; however, at the lower N level there was some evidence of chlorosis on the oldest leaves. Thus, there may be considerable potential to reduce the N supply in a commercial greenhouse setting as long as an adequate supply is provided early in the growing period.

William N. MacDonald, M. James Tsujita, Theo J. Blom, and Barry J. Shelp "Impact of : ratio and nitrogen supply on nitrogen remobilization in potted chrysanthemum grown in a subirrigation system," Canadian Journal of Plant Science 94(5), (18 February 2014). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJPS2013-251
Received: 3 August 2013; Accepted: 1 February 2014; Published: 18 February 2014
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