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1 January 2012 Effectiveness of five soil reclamation and reforestation techniques on oil and gas well sites in northeastern British Columbia
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Abstract

McConkey, T., Bulmer, C. and Sanborn, P. 2012. Effectiveness of five soil reclamation and reforestation techniques on oil and gas well sites in northeastern British Columbia. Can. J. Soil Sci. 92: 165-177. Techniques developed for forestry landing reclamation were applied to five oil and gas well sites in northeastern British Columbia to ameliorate soil and facilitate reforestation. Treatments implemented in fall 2003 and spring 2004 were tillage, wood chip mulch, tillage wood chip mulch, tillage incorporated wood chips, brush mats and a control. Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings were planted. Soil and vegetation were assessed (bulk density, soil mechanical resistance, water content, air filled porosity, water retention, least limiting water range, nutrient availability, seedling survival and growth) throughout 2004 and 2005 growing seasons. Tillage improved soil physical condition, reducing soil mechanical resistance and bulk density; treatments did not affect soil chemical properties. Treatments did not significantly affect species survival; after 6 yr, spruce height and root collar diameter improved with tillage but treatments did not affect pine. Brush mats led to increased spruce growth. Regression relationships between tree performance and soil condition were significant, but generally did not explain large variability. More elaborate soil physical condition measures were no better than bulk density for predicting seedling performance, but relative bulk density and least limiting water range may be useful for evaluating soil productivity.

Trevor McConkey, Chuck Bulmer, and Paul Sanborn "Effectiveness of five soil reclamation and reforestation techniques on oil and gas well sites in northeastern British Columbia," Canadian Journal of Soil Science 92(1), (1 January 2012). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJSS2010-019
Received: 29 October 2010; Accepted: 11 September 2011; Published: 1 January 2012
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