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3 February 2017 Soil changes over 12 yr of conventional vs. conservation management on irrigated rotations in southern Alberta
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Abstract

Increased irrigated production of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in southern Alberta in the 1990s prompted a 12 yr (2000–2011) study to evaluate conservation (CONS) management practices for these crops in 3–6 yr rotations. Conservation management included reduced tillage, cover crops, compost, and narrow-row dry bean. After 12 yr, soil organic carbon (SOC) at 0–30 cm depth increased by 0.48 Mg ha-1 yr-1 on a 5 yr CONS rotation, in line with average cumulative compost addition of 154 Mg ha-1. In contrast, SOC stocks on a 3 yr conventional (CONV) rotation, which did not receive compost, declined by 0.25 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Nitrate-N did not accumulate in the soil profile under CONS management, as it was largely influenced by previous crop. In contrast, available P increased with compost addition under CONS management, leading to surface buildup and downward movement in the soil profile. At 0–120 cm depth, the CONS rotations showed 26%–53% higher available P than CONV rotations between 2005 and 2011. Apart from a caveat regarding potential P accrual, the CONS management package in this study was validated as soil building for irrigated cropping systems in southern Alberta.

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Francis J. Larney, Drusilla C. Pearson, Robert E. Blackshaw, and Newton Z. Lupwayi "Soil changes over 12 yr of conventional vs. conservation management on irrigated rotations in southern Alberta," Canadian Journal of Soil Science 97(2), 249-265, (3 February 2017). https://doi.org/10.1139/cjss-2016-0141
Received: 18 November 2016; Accepted: 1 February 2017; Published: 3 February 2017
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