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4 July 2019 Soil phosphorus bioavailability as influenced by long-term management and applied phosphorus source
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Abstract

Soil phosphorus (P) availability may be impacted by management practices, thereby affecting plant P uptake and plant response to P amendments. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term management on soil P pools and to assess the response of P bioavailability, plant growth, and P uptake to mineral versus manure P treatments. Soils were collected from plots under organic (ORG), organic with composted manure (ORG + M), conventional (CONV), and restored prairie (PRA) management. Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) seedlings were grown in the greenhouse for 106 d in soils amended with various rates of manure or mineral P. The ORG soil had lower concentrations of labile P (resin-P and NaHCO3-P) compared with the CONV and PRA soils, as determined by sequential P fractionation prior to planting. Ryegrass biomass (root + shoot) and shoot P uptake from soils receiving no P were significantly lower for the ORG than all other management systems. Although apparent P use efficiency of the whole plant was increased by low P rate in the ORG management system, the source of applied P, manure > mineral, only influenced Olsen test P.

© Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada 2019. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.
Tandra D. Fraser, Derek H. Lynch, Ivan P. O’Halloran, R. Paul Voroney, Martin H. Entz, and Kari E. Dunfield "Soil phosphorus bioavailability as influenced by long-term management and applied phosphorus source," Canadian Journal of Soil Science 99(3), 292-304, (4 July 2019). https://doi.org/10.1139/cjss-2018-0075
Received: 25 June 2018; Accepted: 11 June 2019; Published: 4 July 2019
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