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1 June 2007 Tree Use by Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) in the Rainforests of Trinidad, W. I.
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Abstract

Relatively little is known about the microhabitat preferences of most species of Neotropical harvestmen. We investigated the use of trunks, buttresses, and the leaf litter in the immediate vicinity of trees by multiple species of harvestmen in a Trinidad, W. I. rainforest. A total of 238 individuals were collected. This included adults of species from the families Cosmetidae, Manaosbiidae, Sclerosomatidae, and Stygnidae. Our results indicate that the cosmetids (2 species), especially Cynortula sp., were the most abundant species to occur on the trees. We also found significant, positive correlations for several species with regard to tree size and the number of individuals present. We hypothesize that harvestmen may use the surfaces of trees as well as the leaf litter in the immediate vicinity of the buttresses as either shelters from potential predators or as areas that provide favorable microclimates (e.g., relatively high humidity).

Copyright 2007 College of Arts and Sciences
Jessica A. Burns, Rebecca K. Hunter, and Victor R. Townsend "Tree Use by Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) in the Rainforests of Trinidad, W. I.," Caribbean Journal of Science 43(1), 138-142, (1 June 2007). https://doi.org/10.18475/cjos.v43i1.a13
Published: 1 June 2007
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