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15 February 2018 Additions to the Flora of Georgia Vouchered at the University of Georgia (GA) and Valdosta State University (VSC) Herbaria
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Abstract

Twenty-seven species, new to the flora of Georgia, are reported here and validated by cited voucher specimens at the University of Georgia (GA) and Valdosta State University (VSC) herbaria, the two largest herbaria in the state. Reassessment and comparison of these collections data have been greatly facilitated by specimen digitization efforts, especially those fostered among herbaria by the GA–VSC Herbaria Collaborative and by the Southeast Regional Network of Expertise and Collections (SERNEC). Four species (Chelone lyonii, Prunus hortulana, Sporobolus arcuatus, and Symphyotrichum simmondsii) are likely native to Georgia and represent range extensions from nearby states. Chelone lyonii and Sporobolus arcuatus are rare and state-ranked critically imperiled (S1) by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The 23 exotic species are more or less naturalized or have potential to naturalize in the state. These nonnatives are escapes from cultivation (15 species) or weedy plants (eight species) that are widespread elsewhere and not typically cultivated. Four species (Cleome monophylla, Lobelia pedunculata, Quercus myrsinifolia, and Sedum emarginatum) are putative first records for the flora of North America, at least as occasional escapes.

Copyright 2018 Southern Appalachian Botanical Society
Wendy B. Zomlefer, J. Richard Carter, James R. Allison, W. Wilson Baker, David E. Giannasi, Steven C. Hughes, Ron W. Lance, Phillip D. Lowe, Patrick S. Lynch, Jennifer T. Miller, Thomas S. Patrick, Eric Prostko, Sabrina Y.S. Sewell, and Alan S. Weakley "Additions to the Flora of Georgia Vouchered at the University of Georgia (GA) and Valdosta State University (VSC) Herbaria," Castanea 83(1), 124-139, (15 February 2018). https://doi.org/10.2179/17-151
Received: 2 October 2017; Accepted: 1 December 2017; Published: 15 February 2018
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