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31 May 2016 The frequency of herbicide-resistant wild oat (Avena spp.) populations remains stable in Western Australian cropping fields
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Abstract

Avena is a problematic weed of cropping regions of southern Australia and many areas of the world. In 2010, a random survey was conducted across 14 million hectares of the Western Australian grain belt to monitor the change in herbicide resistance levels by comparing resistance frequency results with a survey conducted in 2005. Screening Avena populations with herbicides commonly used to control this weed revealed that 48% of Avena populations displayed resistance to the commonly used acetyl-Co A carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides, which was lower than that found in 2005 (71%). The broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and paraquat provided good control of all Avena populations. Resistance to acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides and to flamprop were detected for the first time in Western Australia in this survey. Therefore, a wide range of weed management options that target all phases of the cropping program are needed to sustain these cropping systems in the future.

© CSIRO 2016
Mechelle J. Owen and Stephen B. Powles "The frequency of herbicide-resistant wild oat (Avena spp.) populations remains stable in Western Australian cropping fields," Crop and Pasture Science 67(5), 520-527, (31 May 2016). https://doi.org/10.1071/CP15295
Received: 3 September 2015; Accepted: 1 November 2015; Published: 31 May 2016
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