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15 January 2019 Ability of sulfur-oxidising bacteria to hasten degradation of ground rubber particles in soil for release of zinc as a fertiliser to correct deficiency in wheat
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Abstract

Previous research has shown that ground rubber from tyres can be used to supply fertiliser zinc (Zn) for prevention of Zn-deficiency in crops, and that inoculation of the ground rubber with several bacterial species hastens the release of Zn to the soil. We evaluated the ability of several microbial combinations to speed the release of Zn from ground rubber and to decrease soil pH to favour phytoavailability of Zn to crops. In a batch experiment, treatment combinations of two rates of ground crumb rubber (nil or 300 mg kg–1, equal to 0 or 3.4 mg Zn kg–1) and 24 bacterial inoculants were incorporated into a Zn-deficient calcareous soil. In a pot experiment, two wheat cultivars were grown on the soil without or with ground rubber amendment or with equivalent Zn from ZnSO4 (15 mg kg–1) in combination with two selected microbial treatments. All microbial treatments significantly decreased soil pH at week 3, most notably the inoculant comprising Rhodococcus erythropolis and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (RA) + Pseudomonas putida P41 (P1) + mixed Thiobacillus spp. (Mt). In the presence of tyre rubber, soil pH at week 10 was still significantly lower than the initial value, and soil DTPA-extractable Zn concentration increased until week 6 and then remained unchanged or slightly reduced at week 10. The greatest increase in DTPA-Zn concentration occurred with the RA inoculation. Microbial inoculation treatments were classified by cluster analysis into eight groups based on soil pH and concentrations of iron (Fe) and Zn. Group 8 produced the lowest pH and highest concentrations of DTPA-Fe ( average 6.92 mg kg–1) and DTPA-Zn (average 2.67 mg kg–1). Inoculations with RA and with RA + P1 + T. thioparus were the most effective in hastening an increase in DTPA-extractable Zn and significantly enhanced Zn uptake by wheat plants, whereas inoculations with P. putida P168 and with RA + P2 + Mt were most effective in decreasing soil pH and increasing plant Fe concentration.

© CSIRO 2019
M. J. Asadollahzadeh, A. H. Khoshgoftarmanesh, and R. L. Chaney "Ability of sulfur-oxidising bacteria to hasten degradation of ground rubber particles in soil for release of zinc as a fertiliser to correct deficiency in wheat," Crop and Pasture Science 70(1), 26-35, (15 January 2019). https://doi.org/10.1071/CP16316
Received: 26 August 2016; Accepted: 22 November 2018; Published: 15 January 2019
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