Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2000 Abundance, Diversity, and Activity of Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Oak-Dominated Mixed Appalachian Forests Treated with Microbial Pesticides
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

This study is part of a long-term analysis of nontarget effects of microbial pesticide application in the George Washington (Augusta County, VA, USA) and Monongahela National Forests (Pocahontas County, WV, USA). Ants were collected using pitfall traps to assess the effect of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner variety kurstaki (Foray 48 F) and gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Gypchek) application on ant communities. Ant samples were also compared by sampling years. Pitfall traps were operated for 45 wk during summers of 1995–1997. A total of 31,732 ants was collected from pitfall traps; they belonged to four subfamilies, 17 genera, and 31 species. The ant species richness, diversity, abundance, and species composition did not change as a result of the treatments. Further tests of ant abundance were suggested because the test power was low. Comparisons between sampling years showed a very similar species composition and species evenness. There was a significant decrease in ant abundance in the third year of sampling, which might have been caused by over-trapping. Some rare species did not appear in the second and third year of sampling.

Changlu Wang, John Strazanac, and Linda Butler "Abundance, Diversity, and Activity of Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Oak-Dominated Mixed Appalachian Forests Treated with Microbial Pesticides," Environmental Entomology 29(3), (1 June 2000). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X-29.3.579
Received: 1 April 1999; Accepted: 1 March 2000; Published: 1 June 2000
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top