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1 June 2002 Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Fecundity and Longevity Under Laboratory Conditions: Comparison of Populations from New York and Illinois on Acer saccharum
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Abstract
Reproductive traits and longevity of Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) from the Ravenswood, Chicago, IL, and Bayside, Queens, NY, populations were compared for first-generation adults that emerged from cut infested wood and for second-generation adults that were reared on artificial diet. Illinois females were significantly more fecund than those from New York when they emerged from infested wood and tended to be more fecund when reared on artificial diet. Weights of adult females that emerged from infested wood varied with the hosts they emerged from; but when reared on artificial diet, Illinois females were significantly heavier than New York females. There were no significant differences between the two populations in egg viability or adult longevity. In general, females laid more eggs and survived longer in the laboratory on sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marshall, than has generally been reported for this tree species. Larval food source and quality had significant effects on female fecundity and longevity. The above differences between the two populations and the effects of host quality and host species should be taken into account when management decisions are made in the current eradication program for A. glabripennis in the United States.
and M. A. Keena "Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Fecundity and Longevity Under Laboratory Conditions: Comparison of Populations from New York and Illinois on Acer saccharum," Environmental Entomology 31(3), (1 June 2002). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X-31.3.490
Received: 26 June 2001; Accepted: 1 January 2002; Published: 1 June 2002
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