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1 December 2002 Relative Attractiveness of Natural and Synthetic Pheromone of Three Tortricid Tree Fruit Pests
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Abstract
The relative attractiveness of natural and synthetic pheromone of the obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris), the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), and the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), was compared in apple orchards. A piezoelectric sprayer was used to emit the main and selected minor pheromone compounds at an equal rate from two adjacent traps, one baited with natural and the other baited with synthetic pheromone. The average number of moths captured in traps baited with natural C. rosaceana pheromone was two times greater than the average number captured in traps baited with synthetic pheromone, and the average number of moths captured in traps baited with natural C. pomonella pheromone was four times greater than the average number captured in traps baited with synthetic pheromone. The average number of moths captured in traps baited with natural G. molesta pheromone was two times greater than the average number captured in traps baited with synthetic pheromone; however, the difference was not statistically significant. The results suggest that more effective synthetic pheromone formulations could be developed for monitoring C. rosaceana, C. pomonella and G. molesta, and for orientation disruption of C. rosaceana and C. pomonella.
Ashraf M. El-Sayed and R. M. Trimble "Relative Attractiveness of Natural and Synthetic Pheromone of Three Tortricid Tree Fruit Pests," Environmental Entomology 31(6), (1 December 2002). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X-31.6.960
Received: 11 March 2002; Accepted: 1 May 2002; Published: 1 December 2002
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