Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2005 Effect of Temperature on Development and Population Parameters of Copitarsia decolora (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature on survival, development, and reproduction of Copitarsia decolora. Both linear and nonlinear models were used to model temperature-dependent development and population growth for C. decolora reared on asparagus and artificial diet. We used @Risk Software to bootstrap model parameters so that variability in observations could be incorporated into model predictions. C. decolora eggs required ≈69 DD to complete development with a base temperature of 7.8°C. C. decolora developed through four to six instars depending on temperature and food source. Development of larvae from neonate through prepupa required 341.4 DD above a base of 7.3°C on asparagus, whereas 254.5 DD were needed on artificial diet, where the base temperature was 7.7°C. Pupae required ≈236 DD (base temperature 8.2–8.4°C) to develop when reared on asparagus or artificial diet. Female moths laid significantly more eggs at 14.6 and 20.1°C than at higher or lower temperatures. Survival of individuals to the adult stage increased from 71% at 9.7°C to 93% at 24.9°C. Survival fell off rapidly to 25% at 29.5°C. The generation time was the shortest at 29.5°C; however, only 25% of females survived to the adult stage, fecundity was low, and only 53% of the eggs hatched. The capacity for increase, rc, was low at 9.7°C, peaked at 25.7°C, and declined as temperature increased. We estimated that populations on asparagus would not develop at temperatures >31.3°C or <6.9°C. We show the importance of estimating a range of values for base temperature and degree-days by conducting a preliminary pathway analysis that incorporates the effect of temperature on egg hatch.

Juli Gould, Robert Venette, and Deborah Winograd "Effect of Temperature on Development and Population Parameters of Copitarsia decolora (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)," Environmental Entomology 34(3), 548-556, (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X-34.3.548
Received: 28 October 2004; Accepted: 1 March 2005; Published: 1 June 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top