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1 April 2010 Relationship Between Behavior and Physiology in an Invasive Pest Species: Oviposition Site Selection and Temperature-Dependent Development of the Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
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Abstract
Oviposition site selection is crucial for the reproductive success of a herbivore insect species with relatively sedentary larvae. The optimal oviposition theory, i.e., the preference-performance hypothesis, has thus far mainly been tested with a focus on nutritional quality of the host. This study investigates whether female oriental fruit moth Grapholita (Cydia) molesta choose a microhabitat for oviposition characterized by a temperature range within which their offspring perform best. Thermal preferences of females during oviposition were assessed in a circular temperature gradient arena. Offspring performance and survival were assessed under different constant temperature conditions. Females preferred oviposition sites of ∼30°C over lower and higher temperatures. At this temperature, egg, larval, and pupal development was significantly faster than at 22 and 25°C, and larval development was also faster than at 33°C. At 30°C and at the lower temperatures tested, survival of eggs and larvae was significantly higher than at 33°C, whereas development was precluded at 35°C. Furthermore, female pupal weight attained at 30 and 33°C exceeded that reached at the lower temperatures tested. Considering the potentially reduced predation risk caused by the shorter developmental time of eggs and larvae, the laboratory data suggest that this species maximizes its fitness by selecting a thermally optimal environment for its offspring, supporting the optimal oviposition theory. Conversely, it is known that the codling moth (C. pomonella) lacks a mechanism to avoid temperatures lethal to progeny development, which may reflect the differences in geographic ranges of these tortricids.
© 2010 Entomological Society of America
Claudia Notter-Hausmann and Silvia Dorn "Relationship Between Behavior and Physiology in an Invasive Pest Species: Oviposition Site Selection and Temperature-Dependent Development of the Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)," Environmental Entomology 39(2), (1 April 2010). https://doi.org/10.1603/EN09231
Received: 13 August 2009; Accepted: 1 October 2009; Published: 1 April 2010
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