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1 February 2011 The Role of Frass and Cocoon Volatiles in Host Location by Monodontomerus aeneus, a Parasitoid of Megachilid Solitary Bees
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Abstract

Monodontomerus aeneus (Fonscolombe) is a parasitic wasp that oviposits on the prepupae and pupae of Osmia cornuta (Latreille) and other solitary bee species. A two-armed olfactometer was used to test the olfactory attractiveness of O. cornuta prepupae, cocoon, and larval frass to female M. aeneus. Both cocoon and frass attracted the female parasitoids, but frass alone was more attractive than the cocoon and the cocoon with frass was more attractive than frass alone. Female parasitoids were not attracted by the host prepupa. M33 (methanol) was the organic volatile most emitted by cocoons and m61 (acetic acid) was the compound most emitted by frass. However, cocoons showed higher emission for almost all compounds, including m61 (acetic acid). Although acetic acid alone attracted M. aeneus, a complex volatile signal is probably involved in the attraction process because the ratio of acetic acid and acetaldehyde characteristic of the frass was more attractive than other ratios.

© 2011 Entomological Society of America
Iolanda Filella, Jordi Bosch, Joan Llusià, Roger Seco, and Josep Peñuelas "The Role of Frass and Cocoon Volatiles in Host Location by Monodontomerus aeneus, a Parasitoid of Megachilid Solitary Bees," Environmental Entomology 40(1), 126-131, (1 February 2011). https://doi.org/10.1603/EN10165
Received: 29 June 2010; Accepted: 1 October 2010; Published: 1 February 2011
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