Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2012 Myzus ascalonicus, an Aphid Recently Introduced to Sub-Antarctic Islands, Prefers Native to Exotic Host-Plants
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Newly introduced phytophagous insects can affect native and introduced plant species. If the native plant species evolved without undergoing selective pressure from these insects, insectplant interactions may be different for native and introduced plant species. In particular, this difference may involve mechanisms of plant defense against herbivores. If native plants lack such mechanisms, they may be more palatable to insects than exotic plants. On isolated sub-Antarctic islands, native plant species have evolved in the absence of sap-feeding insects, subsequently introduced a few decades ago. In this study, performance of an introduced aphid species, Myzus ascalonicus Doncaster, was experimentally compared on three native [Pringlea antiscorbutica Hook.f, Acaena magellanica (Lam) Vah, and Leptinella plumosa Hook.f.] and three exotic plant species (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg, Cerastium fontanum Baumg., and Senecio vulgaris L.) found on the Kerguelen Islands. Counts and weights of aphid colonies were 2–7 times higher on native plants than on exotic plants depending on experimental conditions. The results are discussed in light of the possibility of an absence or ineffective defense mechanisms in native plants.

© 2012 Entomological Society of America
M. Hullé "Myzus ascalonicus, an Aphid Recently Introduced to Sub-Antarctic Islands, Prefers Native to Exotic Host-Plants," Environmental Entomology 41(6), (1 December 2012). https://doi.org/10.1603/EN12057
Received: 23 February 2012; Accepted: 1 August 2012; Published: 1 December 2012
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top