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1 February 2013 Effects of Reforestation Practices on Staphylinid Beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in Southwestern China Forests
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Abstract

In 2004, Staphylinid beetle (Coleoptera) assemblages were studied via pitfall trapping to examine the effects of reforestation in southwestern China forests. Sites included two 100-yr-old mature forest types (hemlock—spruce forest and birch forest), and three 40-yr-old forest types established after harvesting (spruce plantation, larch plantation, and natural broad-leaved forest). Staphylinid species richness was greater in natural broad-leaved forests than those in hemlock—spruce forests and spruce plantations, but no significant difference was found in abundance among the five forest types. Beetle assemblages from young forest stands were significantly different from those in older forest stands, and some environmental characteristics, i.e., elevation, proportion of broad-leaved trees, and coarse woody debris, significantly affected species abundances. Moreover, some staphylinid species predominantly found only in older forest stands indicate that mature forest specialists might be threatened by loss of habitat. So it is necessary to retain adequate patches of older successional stages for conserving these beetle assemblages.

© 2013 Entomological Society of America
Tian-Hong Luo, Xiao-Dong Yu, and Hong-Zhang Zhou "Effects of Reforestation Practices on Staphylinid Beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in Southwestern China Forests," Environmental Entomology 42(1), 7-16, (1 February 2013). https://doi.org/10.1603/EN11298
Received: 21 November 2011; Accepted: 16 October 2012; Published: 1 February 2013
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