Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2014 Use of Glacial Acetic Acid to Enhance Bisexual Monitoring of Tortricid Pests With Kairomone Lures in Pome Fruits
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Studies were conducted to assess glacial acetic acid (GAA) with various host plant volatiles (HPVs) and the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8, 10-dodecadien-1-ol, of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L), as lures in traps for tortricid pests that often co-occur in tree fruits in the western United States. In addition to codling moth, field trapping studies were conducted with oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), obliquebanded leafroller Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris), the leafroller Pandemis pyrusana Kearfott, and the eyespotted budmoth, Spilonota ocellana (Denis and Schiffermüller). HPVs included ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester), (E)-4,8dimethyl-l,3,7-nonatriene, butyl hexanoate, (E)-β-ocimene, (E)-β-farnesene, and farnesol. Three types of GAA co-lures differing in a 10-fold range in weekly evaporation rates were tested. The evaporation rate of GAA co-lures was an important factor affecting moth catches. The highest rate tested captured fewer codling moth but more leafrollers and eyespotted budmoth. GAA co-lures caught both sexes of each species. The field life of butyl hexanoate and (E)-β-ocimene lures were much shorter than pear ester or sex pheromone lures. Adding GAA to pear ester or to (E)-β-ocimene significantly increased the catches of only codling moth or oriental fruit moth, respectively. Combining pear ester or (E) -β-ocimene with GAA did not affect the catch of either species compared with the single more attractive HPV. Adding HPVs to GAA did not increase the catches of either leafroller species or eyespotted budmoth. Traps baited with pear ester, sex pheromone, and GAA for monitoring codling moth were also effective in classifying pest pressure of both leafroller species within orchards.

A. L. Knight, R. Hilton, E. Basoalto, and L. L. Stelinski "Use of Glacial Acetic Acid to Enhance Bisexual Monitoring of Tortricid Pests With Kairomone Lures in Pome Fruits," Environmental Entomology 43(6), 1628-1640, (1 December 2014). https://doi.org/10.1603/EN14153
Received: 30 May 2014; Accepted: 1 August 2014; Published: 1 December 2014
JOURNAL ARTICLE
13 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top