Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2001 DOES TOTAL REPRODUCTIVE EFFORT EVOLVE INDEPENDENTLY OF OFFSPRING SIZE?
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

In all species, patterns of reproductive allocation have important fitness consequences and therefore important implications for life-history evolution. Nearly universally, theory in this field has modeled as independent the evolution of total allocation to offspring and the subsequent division of this allocation into many small versus few large offspring. Yet, some theory and a very small amount of experimental evidence suggest that these life-history traits may be evolutionarily linked. Using comparative analyses of copepod life histories, we illustrate that rather than being evolutionarily independent these traits can be linked, in this case, across a very large clade of invertebrates. Our results indicate that a more complete understanding of the evolution of these traits will require greater consideration of simultaneous allocation decisions, rather than sequential ones, and other genetic and selective mechanisms.

Corresponding Editor: T. Kawecki

M. Julian Caley, Lin Schwarzkopf, and Richard Shine "DOES TOTAL REPRODUCTIVE EFFORT EVOLVE INDEPENDENTLY OF OFFSPRING SIZE?," Evolution 55(6), 1245-1248, (1 June 2001). https://doi.org/10.1554/0014-3820(2001)055[1245:DTREEI]2.0.CO;2
Received: 16 November 2000; Accepted: 1 January 2001; Published: 1 June 2001
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top