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1 July 2004 EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL ENVIRONMENT ON SIGNAL-PREFERENCE COUPLING IN A HAWAIIAN CRICKET
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Abstract

Previous work has suggested that developmental temperature influences expression of the adult male calling song of the cricket, a sexually selected mate recognition signal. The role of developmental temperature in shaping female preference functions, and thus its influence on signal-preference coupling has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of developmental temperature are examined in both males and females of the Hawaiian cricket, Laupala cerasina, to determine the degree of signal-preference matching between male song and female preference due to developmental environment. We found that rearing females in different temperature environments affected adult female acoustic preference functions in the same direction as male calling song, thereby influencing variation in adult reproductive behavior in such a way that male and female components remain coordinated. However, we further demonstrate that for male song, the effect of the rearing environment is not permanent but appears only to exert influence for a period of days. This mid-term temperature effect is distinct from the effect of short-term ambient temperature, which influences song in a matter of minutes and has been well documented. Signal-preference coordination, and sexual selection pressures due to mismatching within natural populations, likely will be influenced by nymphal developmental environments of males and females, as well as by adult singing and preference environments.

Jaime L. Grace and Kerry L. Shaw "EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL ENVIRONMENT ON SIGNAL-PREFERENCE COUPLING IN A HAWAIIAN CRICKET," Evolution 58(7), (1 July 2004). https://doi.org/10.1554/04-042
Received: 23 January 2004; Accepted: 29 March 2004; Published: 1 July 2004
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