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1 October 2005 ANTAGONISM BETWEEN SEXUAL AND NATURAL SELECTION IN EXPERIMENTAL POPULATIONS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE
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Abstract

Trade-offs between life-history components are a central concept of evolution and ecology. Sexual and natural selection seem particularly apt to impose antagonistic selective pressures. When sex is not integrated into reproduction, as in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, natural selection can impair or even eliminate it. In this study, a genetic trade-off between the sexual and asexual phases of the yeast life cycle was suggested by sharp declines in the mating and sporulation abilities of unrelated genotypes that were propagated asexually in minimal growth medium and in mice. When sexual selection was applied to populations that had previously evolved asexually, sexual fitness increased but asexual fitness declined. No such negative correlation was observed when sexual selection was applied to an ancestral strain: sexual and asexual fitness both increased. Thus, evolutionary history affected the evolution of genetic correlations, as fitness increases in a population already well adapted to the environment were more likely to come at the expense of sexual functions.

Clifford Zeyl, Ciara Curtin, Kristin Karnap, and Elspeth Beauchamp "ANTAGONISM BETWEEN SEXUAL AND NATURAL SELECTION IN EXPERIMENTAL POPULATIONS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE," Evolution 59(10), 2109-2115, (1 October 2005). https://doi.org/10.1554/05-140.1
Received: 14 March 2005; Accepted: 22 July 2005; Published: 1 October 2005
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