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1 May 2005 INDEPENDENT INHERITANCE OF PREFERENCE AND PERFORMANCE IN HYBRIDS BETWEEN HOST RACES OF MITOURA BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA: LYCAENIDAE)
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Abstract

Divergent natural selection contributes to reproductive isolation among populations adapting to different habitats or resources if hybrids between populations are intermediate in phenotype and suffer an associated, environmentally dependent reduction in fitness. This prediction was tested using two host races of Mitoura butterflies. Thirty-five F1 hybrid and parental lines were created, larvae were raised on the two host plants, and oviposition preferences were assayed in choice arenas. Larvae from both reciprocal hybrid crosses suffered a host-specific reduction in performance: when reared on incense cedar, hybrid survival was approximately 30% less than the survival of pure lines of the cedar-associated host race. The performance of hybrid larvae reared on the other host, MacNab cypress, was not reduced relative to parental genotypes. Females from both reciprocal hybrid crosses preferred to oviposit on incense cedar, the same host that resulted in the reduced survival of hybrid larvae. Thus, dominance is implicated in the inheritance of traits involved in both preference and performance, which do not appear to be genetically linked in Mitoura butterflies. Gene flow between host races may be reduced because the correlation between preference and performance that was previously described in parental populations is essentially broken by hybridization.

Matthew L. Forister "INDEPENDENT INHERITANCE OF PREFERENCE AND PERFORMANCE IN HYBRIDS BETWEEN HOST RACES OF MITOURA BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA: LYCAENIDAE)," Evolution 59(5), 1149-1155, (1 May 2005). https://doi.org/10.1554/04-726
Received: 2 December 2004; Accepted: 25 February 2005; Published: 1 May 2005
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