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1 February 2016 Inter-population plasticity in growth and reproduction of invasive bleak, Alburnus alburnus (Cyprinidae, Actinopterygii), in northeastern Iberian Peninsula
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Abstract

The bleak, Alburnus alburnus, is an invasive fish in the Iberian Peninsula, where this species mainly disturbs the highly endemic fauna via competition and aggression. Despite this impact, information on bleak autecology is scarce in the Iberian Peninsula, with no data on growth and reproduction. The aim of the present study was to compare bleak populations across four Iberian streams: Muga, Fluvià, Cardener and Foix (northeastern Iberian Peninsula). These streams have similar environmental conditions at the regional scale (e.g. Mediterranean climate, geomorphology). In Muga and Foix streams, bleak showed lower growth rate and back-calculated length at age 2. Body condition was lower in Foix streams, whereas length at maturity was higher. In Muga stream, the proportion of females was lower. In Cardener stream, bleak showed higher back-calculated lengths at ages 1 and 2, growth rate, body condition and reproductive investment. Results showed that bleak populations are able to display wide phenotypic plasticity in small Mediterranean-type rivers. Specifically, bleak population “health” appears to be better in Cardener stream, whereas it is worse in Muga and Foix streams. Present findings suggest that inter-population plasticity allows bleak more successfully to invade Mediterranean fresh waters in the Iberian Peninsula.

Guillem Masó, Daniel Latorre, Ali Serhan Tarkan, Anna Vila-Gispert, and David Almeida "Inter-population plasticity in growth and reproduction of invasive bleak, Alburnus alburnus (Cyprinidae, Actinopterygii), in northeastern Iberian Peninsula," Folia Zoologica 65(1), (1 February 2016). https://doi.org/10.25225/fozo.v65.i1.a3.2016
Received: 17 April 2015; Accepted: 1 October 2015; Published: 1 February 2016
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