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1 March 2009 Evidence of Scenedesmaceae (Chlorophyta) from 100 million-year-old amber
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Abstract

Mid-Cretaceous ambers from Aix Island and Cadeuil (Charente-Maritime, southwestern France) have preserved a rich microorganism assemblage of cyanobacteria, testate amoebae, and algae. The assemblage contains the first fossil record of the modern green algae genus Enallax Pascher, 1943 (Chlorococcales, Scenedesmaceae) and a new species, Enallax napoleoni n. sp., is described. This discovery pushes back the origin of the genus Enallax to the Cretaceous. Enallax napoleoni n. sp. probably grew in freshwater ponds of the mid-Cretaceous amber forests of southwestern France under a warm climate, associated with the cyanobacterium Palaeocolteronema cenomanensis Breton & Tostain, 2005.

© Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
Vincent Girard "Evidence of Scenedesmaceae (Chlorophyta) from 100 million-year-old amber," Geodiversitas 31(1), 145-151, (1 March 2009). https://doi.org/10.5252/g2009n1a13
Received: 12 October 2007; Accepted: 1 June 2008; Published: 1 March 2009
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