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2 October 2008 Attempts at immortalization of crustacean primary cell cultures using human cancer genes
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Abstract

Primary cell cultures from crustacea have been initiated since the 1960s, yet no permanent cell line is available. Primary cells have a limited proliferative capacity in culture due to cellular senescence, which is regulated by a group of dominant senescence genes. The aim of this research was to manipulate cell cycle regulation by transfecting Cherax quadricarinatus primary cells with oncogenes, in an effort to induce a permanent cell line. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) play a critical role in the formation of anogenital cancer. Research has demonstrated that the HPV-expressed E6 and E7 proteins function concomitantly to disrupt the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor genes, regulators of the cell-cycle checkpoints at the first gap (G1) phase. HPV E6 and E7 genes were transfected into the C. quadricarinatus cells by lipofection. Successful transfection was demonstrated by the presence of oncogene messenger RNA by reverse transciptase polymerase chain reaction. At day 150, transfected cells still remain viable, although cell proliferation was stagnant. It may be that while transfection of the oncogenes was successful, no proliferation of the C. quadricarinatus cells was evident due to a lack of telomere maintenance.

Kerry Claydon and Leigh Owens "Attempts at immortalization of crustacean primary cell cultures using human cancer genes," In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal 44(10), 451-457, (2 October 2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11626-008-9141-x
Received: 10 June 2008; Accepted: 25 August 2008; Published: 2 October 2008
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