Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2009 Revisiting Bioaccumulation Criteria for POPs and PBT Assessments
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

This paper represents 1 of 9 papers generated from a SETAC Pellston Workshop entitled “Science-Based Guidance and Framework for the Evaluation and Identification of PBTs and POPs,” (January 2008, Florida, USA). The workshop objectives were to develop guidance and recommendations on the evaluation of substances fulfilling PBT and POP criteria, using scientific information such as experimental and monitoring data, and computer models.

Scientists from academia, industry, and government reviewed current international regulations for the screening of commercial chemicals for bioaccumulation in the context of the current state of bioaccumulation science. On the basis of this review, several recommendations were proposed, including a scientific definition for “bioaccumulative substances,” improved criteria for the characterization of bioaccumulative substances (including the trophic magnification factor and the biomagnification factor), novel methods for measuring and calculating bioaccumulation properties, and a framework for screening commercial chemicals for bioaccumulative substances. The proposed framework for bioaccumulation screening improves current practices by reducing miscategorization, making more effective use of available bioaccumulation data that currently cannot be considered, reducing the need for animal testing, providing simpler and cheaper test protocols for animal studies in case animal studies are necessary, making use of alternative testing strategies, including in vitro and in silico metabolic transformation assays, and providing a scientific foundation for bioaccumulation screening that can act to harmonize bioaccumulation screening among various jurisdictions.

Frank A. P. C. Gobas, Watze de Wolf, Lawrence P. Burkhard, Eric Verbruggen, and Kathleen Plotzke "Revisiting Bioaccumulation Criteria for POPs and PBT Assessments," Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 5(4), 624-637, (1 September 2009). https://doi.org/10.1897/IEAM_2008-089.1
Received: 25 November 2008; Accepted: 1 June 2009; Published: 1 September 2009
JOURNAL ARTICLE
14 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top