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1 July 2009 Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Removal Method Affects Native Establishment
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Abstract

We used a growth chamber experiment with first-year garlic mustard plants to explore the effects of three garlic mustard removal techniques (treatment with glyphosate, pulling out the entire plant, and clipping the shoot) on growth of the native herb pale jewelweed and its associated mycorrhizal fungi. We also explored the effects of activated carbon and mycorrhizal inocula amendments. We monitored plant height, intra- and extraradical mycorrhizal structures, root growth, and the fractal dimension of the root system. Removing as much garlic mustard root tissue as possible by hand pulling plants led to larger jewelweed plants than other removal methods. Activated carbon and mycorrhizal inocula did not improve plant growth.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate; garlic mustard, Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara and Grande; pale jewelweed, Impatiens pallida Nutt.

E. Kathryn Barto and Don Cipollini "Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Removal Method Affects Native Establishment," Invasive Plant Science and Management 2(3), (1 July 2009). https://doi.org/10.1614/IPSM-09-011.1
Received: 21 February 2009; Accepted: 1 April 2009; Published: 1 July 2009
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