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1 March 2010 COASTAL PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL J. LACE
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Walker's Beach, Barbados, West Indies on 18 December 2009. View of Walker's Beach and the Atlantic Ocean along the northeastern coastline of the island of Barbados. One of the most densely populated and easternmost islands in the Caribbean, Barbados is culturally distinct and geologically one of the most unique island platforms in the region formed along the peak of a tectonically-active acretionary prism rising out of the Barbados ridge. The coastal silicate dune plain is shown in the foreground with the Scotland District formation in the distance which rises over 300 meters above current mean sea level. The complex non-carbonate shoreline structures of the northeast coast contrast sharply with the series of well-defined, uplifted Pleistocene reef terraces which overlay the silicates and chalks of the northern, western and southern coastal areas. Shoreline and paleoshoreline landforms have been influenced by the complex interplay of multiple coastal processes including fluvial, littoral and tectonic mechanisms as well as dissolution processes associated with freshwater lenses formed during past glacioeustatic sea level stillstands. (Coastal Photograph by Michael J. Lace, Coastal Cave Survey Expedition).

"COASTAL PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL J. LACE," Journal of Coastal Research 26(2), (1 March 2010). https://doi.org/10.2112/1551-5036-26.2.i
Published: 1 March 2010
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