Translator Disclaimer
1 February 2009 “COI-like” Sequences are Becoming Problematic in Molecular Systematic and DNA Barcoding Studies
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene plays a pivotal role in a global effort to document biodiversity and continues to be a gene of choice in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Due to increased attention on this gene as a species' barcode, quality control and sequence homology issues are re-emerging. Taylor and Knouft (2006) attempted to examine gonopod morphology in light of the subgeneric classification scheme within the freshwater crayfish genus Orconectes using COI sequences. However, their erroneous analyses were not only based on supposed mitochondrial sequences but also incorporated many questionable sequences due to the possible presence of numts and manual editing or sequencing errors. In fact, 22 of the 86 sequences were flagged as “COI-like” by GenBank due to the presence of stop codons and indels in what should be the open reading frame of a conservative protein-coding gene. A subsequent search of “COI-like” accessions in GenBank turned up a multitude of taxa across Crustacea from published and unpublished studies thereby warranting this illustrated discussion about quality control, pseudogenes, and sequence composition.

Jennifer E. Buhay "“COI-like” Sequences are Becoming Problematic in Molecular Systematic and DNA Barcoding Studies," Journal of Crustacean Biology 29(1), 96-110, (1 February 2009). https://doi.org/10.1651/08-3020.1
Received: 29 March 2008; Accepted: 1 July 2008; Published: 1 February 2009
JOURNAL ARTICLE
15 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top