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1 December 2007 Consumption of Sugars by Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)
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Abstract

We were interested in determining the feeding response of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae), to various sugar concentrations to develop an improved bait for adults. We compared the consumption of 0.01–1.00 M concentrations of glucose, fructose, raffinose, and sucrose in no-choice tests for 24-h- and 6-d-old male and female flies. Sucrose was the most consumed sugar or within the most consumed group of sugars at 0.02–0.20 M concentrations. There were no differences in consumption among sugars at 0.01, 0.40, and 1.00 M. Consumption generally increased with increasing sugar concentration except that sucrose consumption peaked at 0.20 M. Twenty-four-hour females consumed less fructose than other sugars; 24-h males consumed more sucrose than fructose or raffinose, with an intermediate response to glucose. Females in the 6-d group consumed more sucrose than the other three sugars, whereas 6-d males exhibited no difference in consumption among sugars. In choice tests, flies consumed more sugar solution than water, but the difference between 0.20 M fructose and water was not significant for 24-h males or 24-h females. In choice tests between 0.20 M fructose and 0.20 M sucrose, both 24-h and 6-d females showed a preference for fructose. Males of both age classes showed no preference. These results indicate that the responses of flies to different sugars can vary by sugar, gender, and age.

H. N. Nigg, R. A. Schumann, R. J. Stuart, E. Etxeberria, J. J. Yang, and S. Fraser "Consumption of Sugars by Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)," Journal of Economic Entomology 100(6), (1 December 2007). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493(2007)100[1938:COSBAS]2.0.CO;2
Received: 18 August 2005; Accepted: 1 July 2007; Published: 1 December 2007
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